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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
the united states and now it's costing business in mississippi. and then we have a person who is an activist for the dream act and then all of a sudden her mother gets picked up by the authorities. get a look at this reaction. [ sobbing ] >> cenk: she's going to be on the show today. and then finally here we go again, another republican talking about legitimate rape. >> it is true. we tell couples all the time who are having trouble consuming because of the woman not ovulating, just relax. >> cenk: now wait until you find out the number of women who get pregnant because of rape in america. it's a stunning number. this is a stunning show. go time. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> cenk: all right we got some good news about afghanistan, and the good news is we're leaving. president obama met with hamid karzai, the leader of afghanistan. >> the forces i have ordered to afghanistan have served with honor. they've completed their mission and as promised will return home. the transition is well under way, and soon nearly 90% of a begans will livea--afghans will live in areas where afghan forces have control o
the cdc shows that just three states, california, hawaii, and mississippi are the only places where the flu is not widespread. every other state from alaska to florida is reporting the flu across more than half of their given state. dr. sanjay gupta has tips on recognizing that bug and how to get through it. >> randi, it's the worst flu season in years. we've been talking about it all week. emergency rooms in many places overflows. it's a fascinating story. here's what you need to know. >> the flu strikes fast and symptoms much more severe than a common cold. you feel fine one day and then the next a sudden fever, sore throat, headache, and tightness in the chest. >> over 200,000 people every year are hospitalized with influenza. and anywhere from 3,000 to 50,000 people will die each year. >> reporter: flu cases are at epidemic proportions now in some areas of the country. it's the most we've seen this time of year in a decade. >> they may get more complications from this particular h3n2 strain which may make them ill for a longer period of time. >> it typically surfaces earlier in
, mississippi and hawaii. the advice from physicians. wash your hands and avoid touching your face and keep your germs to yourself. >> if they are sick, don't come to work and don't go to the mall and go to school . don't hang out with your friends. if you are sick stay home and cough in your sleeve and arms. learn -- boston is hit hard and the death tollis 6 . 18 in all of massachusetts. state public health officials say the early arrival and fierce symptoms this season is causing patients to flood emergency rooms and a rush on the vaccine. this year 130 million doses was flu vaccine ared and 112 million are used. supplies are running low in places. but vaccine is still available . new york state andrew cuomo declaring a state wide public health emergency and urging everyone to get the vaccine. since the twine flu epidemic vaccination rates increased in the u.s. . half . americans have still yet to get the vaccine in yearr. >> it is a difficult situation. thank you very much. turning now to a big story making headlines. vice-president joe biden is expected to report his recommendation on gun vi
this is a serious situation. the whole country is covered. mississippi, one state floating out there by itself. >> dana: that is a country named hawaii. is a for you, greg. mississippi, california, hawaii. those are the three. >> eric: every other state that is red, widespread. they still have it. it hasn't been -- >> bob: flu shot to mississippi. >> it's still there. it's yellow. red is the highest level. what do you do if you get the flu? what do you take? tea? honey? >> bob: i never had the flu. i can't tell you. >> eric: so i'll go next. >> andrea: what do we do about the sickness your head. >> eric: that is not the flu. >> dana: thankfully it's not contagious. >> bob: how do you know? >> eric: should we move on. snuggie, stay warm and get sleep. fresh orange juice and vitamin "c." maybe nyquil. for me, sleep. lack of sleep is when i get sus sent to believe the flu. cold and flu. when you get it, rest. >> dana: i believe in the flu shot. i have taken an informal survey of friends of mine, a lot of them are moms. they are against the flu shot. i didn't know how adamant they felt. one of my
of the outbreak. california, mississippi and hawaii. but there are some new clues to show you tonight, stirring hope, and abc's chief medical editor dr. richard besser is here to show you. >> tonight, i'm cautiously optimistic, finally a sign in southern states hit earliest, and hardest, that the peak of the flu epidemic has passed. tonight, amid all of the sneezing and coughing, a glimmer of hope. we talked to hospitals and health departments across the south and many are seeing it. from knoxville, tennessee, "we're seeing that downturn." to north carolina, "looks like we peaked early." but it's not universal. even in the same states, some hospitals are still getting slammed. "our numbers don't yet reflect a downturn," a doctor from duke university hospital, also in north carolina, tells us. this year's flu season hit early, november 25th, a month earlier than a typical one. we're now six weeks into it, and if this year is like years past, we are likely to have six or more weeks to go. it's not too late to get some protection and today, the cdc provided first indication as to how well the vacc
at this map right now. everywhere, but california, hawaii and mississippi, but the biggest concern is that the vaccine supply is already start to go run low. the fed say it's killed 20 children, no count yet how many adults have died. i'm kelly wright, now back to cavuto on business for the latest headlines, log on to foxnews.com. . >> neil: all right, these aren't jobs from the movie outbreak. a triage unit at a pennsylvania hospital, more are going up for treating the latest flu cases and it's not just hospitals across america that are feeling rundown. so is the american workplace and now workers are afraid to call in sick out of fear of losing their jobs, so that could be making that flu outbreak worse. >> absolutely. unemployment still at 7.8% and i think that managers in companies far and wide do enough to tell people to stay at home. but i think that fear is right and just. people are in deep, deep fear of getting fired. and so-- >> but they're afraid of guys like adam, taking an inch and running a mile. (laughter) >> sniffles and out of work for two weeks and mailing it in.
and hawaii and mississippi. but the biggest concern that the vaccine supply is running low . the neds say it has killed 20 children. no count yet of how many adults have died. a new report, lance armstrong plans to admit to doping throughout his career in an upcoming interview with ophrah winfrey. armstrong is not expected to go in specific details of his cheating on the interview. he was stripped of 7 titles and banned for life from the sport. i am kelley wright, we'll see you again at 1:00. back to forbes on fox. we need jobs but not walmart jobs, that's what yunce are saying where one in seven residents are out of work. they are petiddingsing from the employer from building a superstore and creating job in newark, new jersey. you say that unions are hurting the people they are trying to protect. >> walmart means lower prices and more jobs . that means you get more commerce and walmart is able to do this because of productivity and that's what the country is all about. going against walmart is like saying ban the ipods. >> i have periphial vision and i can see rick unger shaking his hea
california, mississippi and hawaii have in common? centers for disease control ask z have a map showing red, yellow and green. we'll explain coming up live. >> coming up at 5:00 stopping statements uttered in court by a one time death row inmate now accused of killing his mom. >> and a fight the governors budget officials explain why they cannot guarantee college >>> cvc -- cdc is out with statistics on nationwide outbreak of flu. >> california is not hit hard yet bit flu but we're live in a kaiser hospital with a look at signs it's on the way. >> yes. yorkts say it women probable will be i hard to avoichld here they're running low, and it's late in the season to be getting that sholt. still, people are just now coming in for their vaccine. >> one, two. three. >> tom has never had a flu shot before but today, he got his first. after witnessing his 23-year-old son swufrt virus. >> my son just got really sick. said dad, i'm deathly ill. he said for three days. i said it's time to get vaccinated. >> at kaiser, the pediatric drop in flu shot clinic reopened today. demand went up. dr. randy berg
to the flu season in years. 47 states are reporting widespread flu activity, california, mississippi, and hawaii are the only states without a widespread flu outbreak. and this season has been deadly. at least 20 children have died, including a texas couple's teenage son. >> he was scared. he said, mom, i'm scared. i said i know, buddy, i am too. and he saw me crying. he said, mom, it's going to be okay. you're going to be okay. i love you. and that's really the last really coherent things that he said to me. >> that was the mother of 17-year-old max, he died just after christmas from the flu. before he got sick, matt was a healthy, normal teenager. and joining me now is dr. jeffrey oiler from piedmont hospital here in atlanta. doctor, it's good to have you. and this is the scenario that scares a lot of people. because you know who is typically sensitive to the flus, the young, the old, those with compromised immune systems. but this is a healthy teenager who died from the flu out of nowhere. how rare is this? >> it's fairly rare. influenza, the main complications are respiratory and
and congress were controlled by democrats from the south and who were racist. he's in mississippi and -- they were the people who controlled the jew judiciary committee and everything that happened and they controlled judicial appointment. kennedy didn't want to offend them. instead of a friendly reception they thought they would. they would be listened to but the administration would try to -- they would take their recommendations and try to incorporate them later on in legislation the civil rights movement forced them to. until the civil rights movement forced them to. they would be blight and say and write notes back and forth to themselves these people think they're going to do this. we're not going this. they found out and tried to cooperate with the administration. they found out that the independence that was put in to the law when they were set up, which made them independent voice of civil rights was really important. and they shouldn't try to, friendly with some particular administration. their job was to be a watchdog, as -- be a watchdog over what the administration wa
was 7.3%. today, it is 5.6%. the second lowest east of the mississippi and the lowest in the southeast. during that time, virginia has created 160,000 jobs, mostly in the private sector. in 2011, we hit our all-time high record for agricultural exports, at $2.35 billion, bolstering virginia's largest industry. together we put in place a stronger environment in which the private sector can create good paying jobs, and virginia is now outperforming its neighboring states. we have also worked hard together to get our fiscal house in order. three years ago, together we closed a budget shortfall of $6 billion without raising taxes. the results were good. we have had three consecutive budget surpluses totaling $1.40 billion. we more than doubled the rainy day fund. we gave two 3% performance bonuses to our great state employees. we have maintained virginia aaa bond rating while the federal government was losing theirs. we bolstered agency efficiency. we eliminated and consolidated dozens of boards and commissions and agencies and programs to save money. we set priorities and cut spending. in
the flu is now widespread in 47 states, everywhere, but california, hawaii and mississippi the biggest concern is that the vaccine supply is already starting to run low. the feds say it's killed 20 children, no count yet of how many adults have died. and president obama speeding up transition in afghanistan, announcing there will be less u.s. troops there starting this spring. this, after a high stakes meeting with afghan president karzai at the white house. the steps winding down the military presence after the mission ends in afghanistan in 2014. our troops will soon be training, advising and assisting afghan forces, no word yet how many have to stay behind. i'm kelly wright, now, back to bulls and bears. >> brenda: we may have just discovered why america's so in it debt. two out of five americans are receiving some form of government assistance. that's 128 million people, a number that's growing faster than the u.s. population. so, until we reverse this trend, will our debt keep going full steam ahead? toby, what do you say? >> of course it will and reverse this trend. remember, 10,
grados especialmente en las carolinas no viene mal. y vemos precipitaciÓn desde mississippi, sobre las carolinas, en todo el noreste, a pesar de estas fuertes lluvias tendrÁn una mejeria, con diciones mÁs secas, y temperaturas en nueva york en el rango de los 60 grados, a diferencia de nosotros aquÍ en todo el sureste, seÑores, mucho frÍo vamos a sentir hasta aviso de heladas se van a reportar, todo el sureste vamos a experimentar temperaturas con el factor viento. continÚan rÁfagas de hasta 40 millas por hora. aquÍ tenemos el patrÓn del tiempo, las bandas de lluvia se mueven al noreste, condiciones estables, los que tendrÁn acciÓn son los residentes del norte del paÍs, hablamos de una tormenta que pudiera depositar hasta mÁs de 6 pulgadas. los Ángeles 54. houston con 72. abundante frÍo en la noche de hoy. asÍ finalizando esta jornada de trabajo. esto es todo de mi parte. gracias por ser parte diferente nuestra familia. continuamos con mÁs. >>> bueno, esto sÍ es una advertencia medica y vamos con cecilia ramÍrez porque tiene dos importantes advertencias sobre product
, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned a tremendous amount of lessons from that, lessons that i hope no other city will ever have to repeat again. but the bottom line is it is so critical at this point to talk about the amazing things and capabilitie
of east texas, louisiana in towards mid mississippi river valley. little stripe of snow behind it as the cold air filters in and we do have the cold conditions across the far northern plains blowing snow this morning is. we will continue to see all the snow yesterday blowing around today it's going to remain windy. this somewhere the cold temperatures are. not a lot of precipitation. might see snow this morning and again across the great vine of southern california. get yesterday for cold for the next four or five days. back to you inside. >> thanks so much, rick. >> let's talk about what's going on in the academy awards. nominations just announced this week there were some surprises. namely that ben affleck was passed over for director and kathryn bigelow was passed over for director for zero dark 30. that came as a huge surprise. what everybody is saying is that she was passed over not because of lack of skill but because of politics. in fact, some people in the academy are going so far as to say that they will not vote for zero dark 30 because they don't like the politics th
to say, california, hawaii, and mississippi. those are the only three states in the country where the flu is not widespread. the only three states still relatively, and i say relatively untouched by the flu. with that in mind, we are going to show you one way that it spreads. take a look as randi kaye presents the anatomy of the sneeze. >> reporter: with the flu so widespread, riding the subway makes new yorkers think twice. we asked dr. len horowitz to ride the rails with us and help us understand the power of a single cough or sneeze. all it takes is one good atchoo to send more than 40,000 drop lets be let barreling in your direction. they can make commuters very sick. if someone used a hand to cover his sneeze, they are going to leave the germs along and i am going to pick them up without knowing it. then, say maybe i come over here and touch my hand to the seat, i'm going to leave those germs behind for the next unsuspecting commuter. it spreads from there. >> dr. who are rhorowitz says g so hearty, they can stay here overnight. >> somebody else gets on here, touches their face and t
, hawaii, mississippi. those are the only threw states in the country where the flu is not widespread. the only three states relatively untouched by the flu. with that in mind, we will show you one way that it spreads. take a look. randi kay looks at the anal me of the sneeze. >> riding the subway makes new yorkers think twice. so many commuters wondering can i get it. we asked this doctor to ride the rails and help us understand the power of a cough or a sneeze. all it takes is one good achoo to send over 40,000 droplets in your direction at 100,000 miles an hour that can make dozens of commuters in a few feet very sick. if a concern used his hand to cover his sneeze, look out. >> if someone sneezed and grabbed this pole, they will leave germs behind. if i hold on to it, i pick up the germs and say i come over here to sit down and touch the seat, i will leave it behind for the next commuter and it spreads from there. a specialist in respiratory illnesses said germs are so hearty, they can survive overnight. >> they're can stay alive 24 hours. if someone tomorrow morning touches it an
've got three things to say, california, hawaii, mississippi. according to the cdc, those are the only three states in the country where the flu is not widespread. the only three states relatively, i say relatively untouched by the flu. with that in mind, we're going to find one way this spreads. take a look. randi kaye presents the anatomy of the sneeze. >> reporter: with the flu so widespread riding the subways these days makes new yorkers think twice. so many new yorkers thinking, can i get it? we asked dr. len horowicz ride the subway with us and help us understand the power of sneeze. all it takes is one good achoo to send 30,000 droplets barrelling in your direction at about 100,000 miles an hour. they can quickly make dozens of commuters within a few feet very sick. if a person used his hand to cover his sneeze, look out. now if someone sneezed and grabbed this poll to hang on to, they're going to leave germs behind and then i hang onto it and i pick them up. then i touch my hands on the seat. i'm going to leave those germs behind for the next unsuspecting commuter and is it spr
of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, iowa, vermont, california and missouri in their times of need. now i trust that they will stand with us. so make no mistake. new jersey's spirit has never been stronger. our resolve never more firm. our unity never more obvious. let there also be no mistake -- much work still lies ahead. damage that comes only once in a century will take in some cases years to repair. here is some of what we have done already -- we have created a cabinet-level position to coordinate the state's efforts across every agency, and marc ferzan is here today, ready to work with you on this restoration effort. we've requested the federal government to pay 100% of the costs of the significant debris removal that we require -- and have already received $18 million for that task. we have secured $20 million from the federal highway administration for emergency repair of our roads, bridges and tunnels -- a down payment on a major infrastructure task ahead. we have directed our department of environmental protection to streamline approvals for restoring critical infrastruct
of just three states where the flu is not widespread. the others are mississippi and hawaii. >>> san jose, maneta airport welcomed its first ever 787 dream liner. it is the most technological equipped plane in the world. san jose mayor chuck reed says it's a good start toward bringing more air travelers to the south bay. >> it's very exciting, it's a huge thing. because this is the first. we need to be successful with the first so we get the second, third and fourth. >> the may -- mayor said much of the technology on board came from the silicon valley. the airliner was just in the area for a few hours then returned to japan. >>> the faa today ordered a comprehensive review of the new plane. ktvu's consumer editor john vacar details a series of problems that set off the high priority federal investigation. >> reporter: for san jose airport bad luck and bad times tainted the inauguration of 787 service to asian. six instances led to today's announce of a review. >> through it we will look for the root causes of recent events and do everything we can to ensure these events don't happen agai
are mississippi and hawaii. >>> san jose, maneta airport welcomed its first ever 787 dream liner. it is the most technological equipped plane in the world. san jose mayor chuck reed says it's a good start toward bringing more air travelers to the south bay. >> it's very exciting, it's a huge thing. because this is the first. we need to be successful with the first so we get the second, third and fourth. >> the may -- mayor said much of the technology on board came from the silicon valley. the airliner was just in the area for a few hours then returned to japan. >>> the faa today ordered a comprehensive review of the new plane. ktvu's consumer editor john vacar details a series of problems that set off the high priority federal investigation. >> reporter: for san jose airport bad luck and bad times tainted the inauguration of 787 service to asian. six instances led to today's announce of a review. >> through it we will look for the root causes of recent events and do everything we can to ensure these events don't happen again. >> reporter: specifically a test aircraft had a small fire back in 20
not experiencing an epidemic of california, mississippi, and allied. here is the good news. hard-hit states fell from 29-24. vaccinations are recommended for everyone six months and older and health officials say it is not too late. and causing major trouble for one new jersey family. of 4-year-old was not allowed to get a preschool for one week because of a state law which requires children the age of five to give a shot. paris refused even if they shut because the boys allergy. the school finally relented and the board will be going back monday, but should this have happened in the first place? whitney vice his legal analyst, criminal defense attorney and former prosecutor. he added doctor's note. his pediatrician city could get sick. the parents of the kid said we're not trying to make that kind of mistake, that kind of risk and love this kid may be potentially to lose his life. gerri: well, you know, the doctor wrote a note but did not make the connection between the elegy and the flu shot which might have been the problem. what do you make of this? >> the funny thing is i went to this eleme
california, mississippi and hawaii have been spared so far, but those numbers may lag a couple of weeks behind. >> jamie: yeah, and the numbers are pretty startling. we've recently learned now 27 people dead in minnesota, 22 in pennsylvania, 18 in massachusetts, 8 in oklahoma, 6 in illinois. anna kooiman in the new york city news room with the latest. >> reporter: new york state governor andrew cuomo declaring a state wide emergency, and encouraged everyone to get the flu vaccine. officials say supplies are running low in some places, but the vaccine is still available. nearly 130 million doses of flu vaccine have been distributed and 112 million have been used. since the swine flu epidemic in 2009 vaccination rates have increased here in the united states, but more than half of americans have yet to get the vaccine this year. physicians say it's not too late to get your shots. >> the best way to prevent the flu right now is to get the flu shot. and a lot of people have some hesitation getting the flu shot. the flu shots are the best way to prevent the flu from occurring. >> reporter:
, california, hawaii, and mississippi, are the only places where the flu is not widespread. our chief medical correspondent, dr. sanjay gupta, has some tips now on recognizing the bug and how to get through it. >> randi, it's the worst flu season in years. we've been talking about it all week. emergency rooms in many places overflowing. it's a fast-moving story. here is what you need to know. the flu strikes fast and symptoms, much more severe than a common cold. you feel fine one day and then the next, a sudden fever, sore throat, headache and tightness in the chest. >> over 200,000 people every year are hospitalized with influenza and anywhere from three to nearly 50,000 people will die each year. >> reporter: flu cases are at epidemic proportions in areas of the country. it's the most we've seen this time of year in a decade. >> they may get more complications from this particular h3n2 strain, which may make them ill for a longer period of time. >> the active strain is h3n2, tends to produce stronger symptoms, appears earlier in the season. and it is highly contagious. when someone coughs
are california, hawaii, and mississippi. one of the reasons that the flu is so dangerous is because it spreads so quickly and so easily. a simple sneeze can spread germs that can live for hours on a surface. to find out just how easily the flu can spread, i took a ride on a new york city subway. with the flu so widespread, riding the subway makes new yorkers think twice. so many commuters wondering can i get it. we asked dr. lynn horowitz to ride the rails with us and help us understand the power of a single cough or sneeze. all it takes is one good achoo to send well over 40,000 droplets barreling in your direction. at about 100,000 miles an hour. they can quickly make dozens of commuters within a few feet very sick. if a person used his hand to cover his sneeze, look out. if someone sneezed and then grabbed this pole to hang on to, they're going to leave germs behind. say i hold on to the pole, i'm going to pick up those germs without knowing it. then, say, maybe i come here to sit down and i touch my hand to the seat. i'm going to leave germs behind for the next unsuspecting commuter. and it s
down into jackson, mississippi, new orleans, most likely picking up more than two inches of rain. as for snow on the back side of the system, it does look like a widespread one to three inches from chicago right down into columbus. we are looking at this cold front to slowly spread eastward. we could see somerapher downpours and stronger storms from northeast texas right on into western tennessee. the eastern half of the country will be about 15 to almost 30 degrees above normal. the west side of that front, though, could see temperatures 30 degrees below normal. go >>> another chilly start around the bay area. we've got cold enough temperatures for patchy frost in the north bay and east bay and mainly clear skies but high clouds drifting in from time to time this morning and partly cloudy skies into the afternoon. we'll see another cool day close to the upper 40s to low 50s throughout the bay area with a slight risk of an isolated shower staying offshore later on in the afternoon. dry finish to the weekend with some frosty mornings, cool temperatures, a bit warm ear approaching
, mississippi, and hawaii. the advice from physicians, wash your hands as often as possible. avoid touching your face. and keep your germs to yourself. don't go to work and don't let your kids go to school. boston has been hit particularly hard. the death toll from flu has now hit six, 18 in all of massachusetts. state public health officials say the flu's early arrival and its fierce symptoms this season have been causing patients to flood emergency rooms and a rush on vaccine. this year, nearly 130 million doses of flu vaccine have been distributed and so far, at least 112 million have been used. officials say supplies are running low in some places, but vaccine is still available. and new york state governor andrew cuomo this morning, declaring a statewide public health emergency, strongly encouraging everyone to get the flu vaccine. since the swine flu epidemic in 2009, vaccination rates have increased in the u.s., but more than half of americans have yet to get the vaccine this year. back to you. >> anna, thank you so much for that report. >>> well, police in southern california are checkin
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)